End of the Road for 2016

It’s the beginning of December, and time for another change in my life! Last Thursday, I put my RV into storage in Sarasota, Florida, and I’m renting my cousin’s Siesta Key house for the winter.

The past few months have flown by and have truly been a time of transition. Here’s where I’ve been:

Fall 2016 RV Route
Fall 2016 RV Route

I’ve driven about 2,650 miles since leaving  New Jersey on September 20th, and spent $750 in gas.  Campground fees averaged $1,000 per month, even with some “free” time in there for visits with friends and family.  I’ve learned that it’s less expensive, both in gas and campground fees, to stay put in one place for a month at a time.  The per night monthly rate at a campground is often half the daily rate.  And why not?  I’m certainly in no hurry!

On the genealogy front, I’ve barely scratched the surface of the work I need to do.  At the beginning, I thought that a week of genealogy research in one place would be oodles of time. After all, a week was the length of a normal vacation from work.  As it turns out, a week is no time at all. Another reason to stay put in one place for a month!

I found that after a week of research in Washington County, Pennsylvania, a week in Cattaraugus County, New York, and a week in Cortland County, New York, all back to back, and then a couple of weeks in Walton County, Georgia, I have accumulated masses of papers and digital photos which have not been processed.

My pile of papers is similar to this!
My pile of papers is similar to this!

All the papers and photos need to be uploaded or scanned, cataloged, abstracted, and/or transcribed.  Someone once told me that she doesn’t do any more research until she’s processed what she has.  Smart.  Clearly, I didn’t have time to process the first batch of research, when all of a sudden it was time for the next.  Lesson learned!

Obviously there were many lessons learned about RVing, especially since when I started, I hadn’t ever driven one, or towed a car, either.  When I look at the rig, I think it’s amazing that I am actually comfortable behind the wheel.  What a ride!

I remember reading a blog which was recommending that a single person NOT try to hitch a car up to an RV alone.  If anyone reading this is considering towing a car,  my advice is that it’s a necessity to have a vehicle to drive that’s separate from the RV, and a single person can hook it up in a snap.  It’s a non-issue.

Hooking up the Cooper
Hooking up the Cooper

I was also told that managing the awning is a two person job; I’ve mastered that task on my own as well.  It’s been quite a learning experience finding that all these new things are completely do-able!

It was sad to say goodbye to the RV for the winter – I’ll miss it!  It has been my little home, and I’ve grown to love it.  I’ll write more about my winter schedule soon, but for now I’ll just say that I’m planning to get back on the road again in early April.  Meanwhile, I’m going to enjoy having a full kitchen, reliable internet, a bathtub, and a laundry which doesn’t require quarters!